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Signature noodle dishes you can only find in Hanoi

Signature noodle dishes you can only find in Hanoi

Besides Pho, Vietnamese cuisine has also many amazing noodle dishes. You may think most of them are quite similar, but this is a common misconception. Hanoi is a wonderful land for those who want to explore the quintessence of cuisine in Vietnam. Here are the noodle dishes that you can taste only in Hanoi.Bun chaPho might be Vietnam’s most famous dish, but bun cha is a lunchtime obsession. The components of this dish are served separately, a broth made of vinegar, lime, sugar and fish sauce, along with vermicelli noodles, a basket of herbs and veggies, and a separate dish of seasoned pork patties and slices of pork belly grilled over a charcoal fire. Mix a little bit of everything together and have a hearty bite.Bun rieu cuaBun rieu cua is a vermicelli soup with a tomato-based broth made by slowly simmering pork or chicken bone. But unlike pho or bun bo Hue (Hue beef noodle soup), to which meat slices are added, the key protein component of this soup is the crab meat mixture made of freshwater mini crabs, pork and egg that is almost like a patty. This soup is hearty and wonderful during winter as it combines lots of ingredients like fried tofu, prawns, crab meat, pig blood pudding, bean sprouts and fresh Vietnamese herbs like perilla and cilantro. If you don’t mind the pungent smell, feel free to add some shrimp paste for extra savory since the soup is slightly acidic.Bun ocBeing one of the most famous dishes of Hanoi, bun oc can satisfy people of all ages. The dish, however, is very simple, containing only rice vermicelli, several snails, sour broth and herbs. This is a special cuisine of Hanoi. Anyone who once lived in Hanoi cannot forget this cuisine, which has nourishing flavor of thickened vinegar, moreish and brittle snails, dried tofu, raw vegetables, etc. Although it is quite easy to cook, it needs secrets to have a delicious bowl of bun oc.Bun thangBun thang or rice vermicelli with chicken, egg and pork can be enjoyed at any time of the day. The clear yet flavorful broth is made with 20 ingredients, including dried shrimp, squid, shrimp paste, spring onion, coriander, ginger, mushroom, beet, fish sauce, sugar candy, and vinegar. It is also a particularly attractive Hanoi dish as the noodles, chicken, eggs, pork slices, and a dollop of shrimp paste are carefully arranged to resemble a flower. Bun thang is one of the most popular yet hidden fares in Hanoi and one can find it only outside of the Old Quarters or a few special restaurants scattered across the city. The chicken broth is artistically done and the dish is beautifully served.Mien luonImage: Will Fly For FoodThe main ingredients of mien lươn are mien (cellophane noodles), luon (eels), fried shallots, bean sprouts and cilantro. The eels are usually deep fried to eliminate their fishy smell and to add a tasty, crunchy touch to the dish.Mien nganImage: @phuongtrangNorthern Vietnamese have certain rules for what food pairs best together. Bun tends to go with fish and shellfish, while phở is usually eaten with either beef or chicken. Mien (cellophane noodles) can go with either freshwater eels or poultry such as ngan (creole duck), and mien ngan is creole duck cellophane noodle soup. The combination of the duck and bamboo shoots in this dish is absolutely perfect.Source Internet
Visit Can Tho and taste local dishes

Visit Can Tho and taste local dishes

As the fourth largest city in Vietnam, Can Tho, in the Mekong Delta, is an excellent place to experience the food of the region. For sure, larger metropolises also have their allure. Can Tho is full of foods and specialty dishes which attract lots of travelers.Nem nuong (Grilled pork roll)Considered the best dish in Can Tho, this dish is made from fresh minced pork, which is swept then kneaded into round meat balls, next it’s grilled on a hot coal stove. Nem nuong is eaten with herbs, green banana, cucumber, pineapple, starfruit, etc This is one of the best dishes in Vietnam and is not only amazingly delicious but extremely healthy too.Lau mam (Hotpot with fermented fish)The main ingredient of this dish is salted fish made of ca linh (a species of small fish). When boiling the dish, it creates a distinct and mouth-watering smell of salted fished. The dishes other ingredients include mixed lean and fat meat, eel, snail, soya curd. However, the most attractive and healthy ingredients are the dozens of fresh vegetables namely lotus rootstock, water-lily, colza, coriander, banana flower, water hyacinth, etc. This dish is a kind of hot pot and is served as a soup. The vegetables are added after the soup is heated up and together make for a healthy and delicious eating experience.Banh Tam biTam bi cake consists of 2 main parts: Tam cake and Bi. Made from rice flour, Tam cake is thick, long, tender, a little chewy, white noodle. Chewy and smelling Bi is made by boiling, cut pigskin into thin strips, mix with toasted rice powder, minced garlic, deep-fried onion, salt, sugar, etc. To serve the cake, they top Tam cake with Bi, pickles, herbs, onion oil and a greasy sauce from coconut cream. When eating, dinner pours sweet-sour fish sauce dip onto the plate of Tam bi cake, then eat with chopsticks. A perfect mix of all sweet, salty, sour, bitter, hot tastes is worth a try on your trip to Can Tho.Banh tet la cam (Cylindrical sticky rice cake)“Banh tet la cam” has a very distinct taste. It is made from fragrant sticky rice soaked with la cam to get a purple colour. When the sticky rice is well done, it has a velvety purple, covering stuffed with meat, egg, grease, green bean, etc… It looks attractive when it is made with many different colours such as green, red, purple, yellow, and brown. The egg or meat is stuffed inside of the sticky rice and then wrapped like a spring roll, and usually wrapped in banana leaf. It has a kind of gelatinous texture and tastes strongly of the meat or egg mixture inside. It’s makes for a very colorful looking snack.Chuoi nep nuong (Grilled banana in steamed rice cake)This is the most popular dish in the Mekong delta region of Vietnam. The recipe is simple: wrap the peeled apple banana in steamed sticky rice, then a layer of banana leaf wrap, grill the cake on charcoal until banana leaves turn black-brown and a little burnt and smelling. The outside steamed sticky rice turns crispy and yellow, the inner banana turns tender, sweeter than the raw banana, a little chewy. This is a delicious treat and is often eaten as a dessert.Banh CongCong Cake is a very delicious Vietnamese traditional savory cake which is as small as a muffin, crispy outside, airy and soft inside. The cake buttery, tender, crispy at the same time. Main ingredients to make this cake are rice flour, mung bean, pork, and shrimp. The cake is named after a special tool called “Cong” used to mold and fry it.Traditionally, rice is soaked in water and ground with water to make a rice flour mixture. Whole mung bean is soaked in water for about 6 hours, then cooked until tender and put into the mixture. Firstly, the cook must put “Cong” into hot oil so that “Cong” is hot. After that, the cook pours the mixture into the “Cong”, top two or three shrimps onto the mixture and fries until the cake turns crispy and yellow. Cong Cake should be served hot with fresh vegetables and herbs, sweet and sour dipping fish sauce.Banh DucVietnam has more than 20 Duc cake recipes including sweet and savory. Duc cake originated from North Vietnam. People in North, Central, and South Vietnam have changed the recipe of Duc cake to meet local tastes and preferences as well as local products. Banh Duc in Can Tho is white, tender, and smooth. High-quality rice is soaked in water, ground into rice flour, mixed with coconut cream. The topping of the cake is made from shrimp, lean pork, jicama, shallots, and garlic. All of the above are minced, stir-fried until pleasant. Rice flour mixture is ladled onto the tray layer by layer. At last, the toppings are put onto the last layer. The cake is steamed until all are well-done.Oc nuong tieu (Grilled escargot with pepper)Grilled escargot with pepper is a very strange exotic dish in Can Tho. Escargot is a very popular food in Can Tho as well as Mekong Delta for its tenter and crunchy sweet-tasty flesh. To make this dish, the snail is boiled, then put into a pot to grill on charcoal with a mix of salt, fish sauce, sugar, pepper until the broth inside its shell boils for a while. The escargot should not be grilled for too long. Otherwise, its flesh will turn dry and not very tasty. The dish is served with Vietnamese mint. It pairs well with beer. This dish is high in calcium, other vitamins and minerals.Source Internet
What to eat in Luang Prabang Night Market

What to eat in Luang Prabang Night Market

Lao food bargains line a narrow alley just off the Luang Prabang Night Market entrance - positioned just right for visitors who want to start their shopping evening with a meal, or for tired shoppers looking for a quick bite. The night market covers Laos’ extensive menu of local favorites.Roasted meatsThe Lao are old hands at barbecues, to go by the ample amounts of ping kai (roast chicken) and ping pa (roast river fish) sold in the food street. Each serving is cooked as you order — skewered or clamped by bamboo sticks over glowing charcoal, then served piping-hot.Lao sausagesLuang Prabang’s take on Lao sausages involve a healthy helping of fatty pork and sticky rice flavored with herbs and chilies.Coconut pancakesTiny platefuls of khao nom krok are made and sold just outside the food street, served freshly-cooked and piping-hot in threes on banana-leaf plates. If you’re looking for a cheap pick-me-up, an added boost of sugar that won’t interrupt your shopping, look no further.Vegetarian foodIn the land of the papaya salad (tam mak houng), it should be no surprise that vegetarians have plenty of options in Luang Prabang’s food street. Two different vegetarian stalls sell all-you-can-eat buffet options for as little as LAK 15,000 (about $1.75) per plate.Fruit shakesThe Market’s most visible drinks stalls can be found on the opposite end of the street from the food alley — the corner in front of the National Museum hosts vendors selling shakes made from fruits like mango, dragonfruit, and limes. These stalls are perfectly positioned to offer post-shopping refreshments for tired tourists.Source: Internet
Unique foods that define Ha Long

Unique foods that define Ha Long

Most people only think about Ha Long Bay the moment Ha Long is mentioned. However, little did they know that Ha Long also has some of the most unique foods that you cannot find anywhere else in Vietnam.Cha MucCha Muc is the most famous food of Quang Ninh and also in the top 50 specialties of Vietnam. The main ingredient of Cha Muc is squid. However, according to local fishermen, chefs must only use squid from Ha Long. The crunchy texture of squids goes perfectly well with Xoi (boiled rice, sticky rice) or Banh Cuon (a type of thin, steamed rice cake).NganYou can find Ngan only in Quang Ninh province. It looks like a clam but much bigger, and is claimed to be good for a person's circulatory system. The locals drink it with wine, or cook in porridge or soup.Steamed “Tu Hai”Tu Hai is the speciality of Van Don Island district, some other places call it snail spout. It is a type of shellfish, but it is rare and valuable. You can cook soup or salad with “tu hai” or you can steam or bake it. Steamed “tu hai” is sweet and cool, and is meat mixed with spice.Banh Gat GuBanh Gat Gu is similar with steamed rolled rice pancake. It is made from rice flour. When making this kind of cake, the maker have a secret to make it more delicious by adding cold rice.Sa Sung (Sandworm)Sa sung, also known as sandworm, is a typical seafood in Halong. Fresh sandworm stir-fried with celery and leek creates delicious dish. Dried sandworm, turned to dark color, will be grilled or fried. It tastes crunchy and buttery. It is used when drinking alcohol, especially used as seasoning for noodle broth.SamAnother fascinating specialty of Halong is Sam - an Arthropod Crustacean. Sam can be used to make a lot of delicious and strange food. Tiet Canh Sam , Goi Sam, Sweet and sour stir-fried, sam egg fried with guise leaves, steamed sam, breaded fried sam, grilled cartilage sam, sam fried with vermicelli, etc.Source: Internet
24-hour culinary experience in Sai Gon

24-hour culinary experience in Sai Gon

The best Sai Gon dishes are well regarded as nutritious, savory, and hearty delights that can be enjoyed at any time of the day. Some of the defining traits in Vietnamese cuisine include rice, noodles, seafood, pork and beef, as well as various fresh herbs and spices, all of which result in robust flavors and unique interpretations. Although the city is evolving into a cosmopolitan landscape with sprawling shopping malls, fine-dining restaurants and luxury hotels, you can still find plenty of roadside eateries, vibrant street market, and street food carts to satisfy your appetite for authentic Vietnamese delicacies.Banh miOtherwise known as the Vietnamese sandwich, banh mi is one of the most popular Vietnamese specialties abroad. It’s also very easy to make by yourself. Banh mi consists of Vietnamese baguettes with fillings of meat and vegetables with chili sauce or mayonnaise. Depending on your preference, the meat options are pork, chicken, cha lua (Vietnamese sausage), cha ca (fish patty), fried eggs, liver pate, or meatballs. The vegetables typically include tomato, cucumber, and coriander.Xoi (Sticky rice)Xoi is a very simplistic dish. There are two main types: sweet and savory. The sweet varieties include sticky rice made with corn, black urad beans, mung beans, etc. The savory type is sticky rice with chicken, sausage, pork floss, and/or quail eggs. Sticky rice is sometimes served with banh da and pandan leaves.Com tam (Broken rice)Com tam is actually ‘broken rice’ in Vietnamese, usually served with fried egg, diced green onions, and a variety of meats such as suon nuong (barbecued pork chop), bi (shredded pork skin), and cha trung (steamed pork and egg patty). Diners can also enjoy this dish with a side of pickled vegetables, cucumber slices, and nuoc cham Vietnamese dipping sauce. Com tam can be enjoyed any time of the day as it is relatively inexpensive, with street markets and roadside food stalls.Bun thit nuongA hearty dish in Ho Chi Minh City, bun thit nuong features vermicelli rice noodles with freshly chopped lettuce, sliced cucumber, bean sprouts, pickled daikon and carrot, basil, chopped peanuts, and mint, topped with grilled yet tender pork shoulder. Diners can also opt for bun thit nuong cha gio, which comes with crunchy slices of cha gio (deep-fried eggrolls). As with most Vietnamese dishes, you also get a side of nuoc cham sauce to mix into the bun thit nuong for a flavourful ensemble.Bot chienThis is basically fried rice cake. The cakes are sliced into bite sized pieces, then fried, normally on a hot skillet in lots of lard, along with some light seasonings, until crispy and golden brown on the edges. Once cooked, the rice cakes are topped with an egg and a handful of green onions before being served. The result of bot chien are little bite sized nuggets of crispy sticky rice flour, enriched with egg, and with a nice smoky flavor.Goi cuonGoi cuon or Vietnamese rolls comprise vermicelli noodles, pork slices, shrimp, basil, and lettuce tightly wrapped in translucent banh trang (rice papers). Due to its very subtle flavor, you can dip it in a mix of freshly ground chilli and hoisin-based dipping sauce topped with crushed peanuts. This traditional appetizer is a healthier alternative to cha gio, which is a deep-fried egg roll made with a combination of mung bean noodles, minced pork, and various spices.Pha lauPha lau, an exotic street food commonly found in Sai Gon, is an offal stew filled with pig or cow innards and cooked with herbs and seasoning in a way similar to curry, although not as spicy. What makes this dish unique is the chewy pieces which are yet soft enough to melt in your mouth. Each vendor will have its unique way of flavoring the broth. You can also order some bread to eat along with this rich broth. Locals also dip the organs into a fish sauce with minced chilies to enhance the flavor.Sup cuaFresh stripped crab meat is the star of this delicious dish. Crab soup is a perfect comfort food that many Vietnamese are familiar with. The soup has crab, tapioca starch, shitake mushrooms, snow mushrooms, and quail eggs.Source Internet
Facts you may not know about Vietnamese cuisine

Facts you may not know about Vietnamese cuisine

Vietnam’s food is one of the most fascinating parts of the country’s culture. It is complex, dynamic and often surprising – but never boring. Here are some facts you probably didn’t know about Vietnamese cuisine.Five is the magic numberLike many Asian cuisines, Vietnamese food is underpinned by the Xu Wing and Mahābhūta principles. These philosophies emphasise the importance of the balance between the five elements for health and well-being. This means that each Vietnamese dish features a careful combination of five flavours: sweet, sour, salty, bitter and hot. This sensational synthesis makes every meal an invigorating and memorable experience.Savoury breakfastsBreakfast in Vietnam is strictly a savoury affair; you’re unlikely to find many people chowing down on sugary breakfast cereals here. The Vietnamese are early risers and they need serious fuel, so it’s all about steaming hot soup, broken rice and bánh mìs for starting the day. The country’s famous phở soup is in fact traditionally a breakfast dish – although it can be consumed any time of the day.Liquid dessertsGiven the often sweltering temperatures in Vietnam, it’s no surprise that people tend to prefer cold, liquid desserts. Chè refers to Vietnamese dessert soups, drinks and puddings, which often consist of coconut milk, mung or kidney beans and fruit – to name just a few of many potential ingredients. The tastiest options include chè chuối (banana and coconut milk soup) and chè bắp (sweetcorn and glutinous rice pudding). If you’re looking for a photogenic dessert be sure to try chè ba màu, a traffic light-coloured drink made with beans and jelly that’s instantly refreshing.Regional differencesVietnam is divided into three main regions: north, south and central. Although there are common threads between the cuisines of these areas, each boasts its own individual characteristics. In northern Vietnam, food tends to be less spicy and black pepper is strongly favoured over chilli. It’s also home to the legendary bún chả, which Barack Obama and Anthony Bourdain famously enjoyed together in 2016. Central Vietnam, however, boasts complex mixtures of spicy flavours. The cuisine of Hue, the ancient capital of Vietnam, is particularly revered for its variety of distinctive and delicious dishes. Southern Vietnamese cuisine tends to be sweeter and the region’s fertile soil means that herbs are used more liberally in cooking. The southern version of phở tends to be more popular than its northern counterpart, although it’s best to try both to be sure.Fetal duck eggsHột vịt lộn – duck eggs containing partially developed foetuses – are a popular street food in Vietnam. Often washed down with beer, these eggs are boiled and eaten straight from the shell, with sides and condiments varying regionally. Hột vịt lộn are beloved in Vietnam due to their rich taste and high nutritional value, and are also popular in several other Southeast Asian countries. The eggs are traditionally consumed by pregnant women for strength and fortification.Fish sauceFish sauce – or nước mắm – is a major component of Vietnamese cuisine. Made from fermented anchovies and salt, the sauce tends to lose its strong fish taste when combined with other ingredients and instead adds simultaneously sweet and salty flavours to the food. This incredibly versatile condiment is used in many popular dishes and as a delicious dipping sauce for spring rolls, bún chả and broken rice. No experience of Vietnamese cuisine is complete without a taste of nước mắm.Source: Internet
Explore traditional breakfast dishes served in Vietnam

Explore traditional breakfast dishes served in Vietnam

Breakfast plays a very important role as it is the energy source for a whole hard working day. In the past, breakfasts were cooked by deft hands of women in a family which enhances much the taste of the foods. Traditional breakfast choices in Vietnam are incredibly varied and all worth a try. Here are the most popular breakfast dishes in Vietnam.Com Tam (Broken Rice)This is likely the most customizable dish on this list. It’s a bed of broken rice – the cheapest kind – topped with any number of things, including fish, pork, meat balls, morning glory, pickled veggies and so much more. The options change with every restaurant. Broken rice used to be undesirable, but now many people prefer it.Banh miOtherwise known as the Vietnamese sandwich, banh mi is one of the most popular Vietnamese specialties abroad. It’s also very easy to make by yourself. Banh mi consists of Vietnamese baguettes with fillings of meat and vegetables, sometimes with chili sauce or mayonnaise.Depending on your preference, the meat options are pork, chicken, cha lua (Vietnamese sausage), cha ca (fish patty), fried eggs, liver pate, or meatballs. The vegetables typically include tomato, cucumber, and coriander.PhoPho is not only the most popular breakfast in Vietnam but is also internationally renowned as a symbol of Vietnamese gastronomy. Thousands of Pho stores deliver thousands of taste, that’s why some Pho stores are much more well-known than the rest, and the mystery hidden in the broth of Pho.Pho can be made with beef or chicken, with the accompanying rice noodle and broth. The broth is the most distinctive feature of the dish, made from simmering the beef or chicken bones with seasoning and spices. And as with all Vietnamese noodle dishes, Pho is usually served with herbs and vegetables, as well as chili sauce.Xoi (Sticky Rice)Xoi is a very simplistic dish. There are two main types: sweet and savory. The sweet varieties include sticky rice made with corn, black urad beans, mung beans, etc. The savory type is sticky rice with chicken, sausage, pork floss, and/or quail eggs. Sticky rice is sometimes served with banh da and pandan leaves.BunSimilar to Pho, Bun is made of rice flour but instead of flat triangle shape like Pho, Bun has small and circular shape. Recipes to make Bun’s broth are even more diverse than Pho, which result in different vermicelli dishes, most popular ones are Bun Cha (vermicelli and grilled chopped meat), Bun Rieu (vermicelli and crab meat soup), Bun Thang (varied vermicelli), Bun Ca (vermicelli with fried fish) and Bun Oc (vermicelli and snail), while Bun Bo (vermicelli with beef) is specialty of Hue. Specific trait of Bun is an adequate sour taste the main ingredients of their soup are tomato, garcinia cowa and lemon lime.Banh CuonThese are a kind of Vietnamese pancake, made by steaming fermented rice batter over a cloth to make thin, wavy sheets. Once you add in the minced shallots, ground pork, mushrooms and some fish sauce, you have a healthy and filling breakfast.Source Internet
4 best desserts to try in Myanmar

4 best desserts to try in Myanmar

There are a wide variety of Myanmar traditional snacks and deserts on offer in Yangon. Some are sweet and some are savoury. I would like to introduce some sweet desserts that can be served as cool drinks as well. These 4 desserts are the most popular among locals as well as foreigners.Mont Let SaungMont Let Saung is a traditional drink made from sugar or palm sugar syrup and coconut milk mixed with small lumps of rice jelly. It’s a sweet and cooling drink which can be served as a dessert. Mont Let Saung Phat (small lumps of rice jelly) is widely available in most shops. It’s easy to make palm sugar syrup by simply dissolving palm sugar in boiling water and letting the syrup cool. You can add coconut milk if you like it, or just drink palm sugar syrup with the Mont Lat Saung Phat. Another alternative is to add shredded coconut and ice cubes for a cold refreshing drink or dessert.Kyauk Kyaw (Coconut Milk Agar)Kyauk Kyaw is usually served as a special dessert for offering in ceremonies and rituals. It’s made of agar, coconut milk and sugar. Some make fruit Kyauk Kyaw such as Orange Kyauk Kyaw, Strawberry Kyauk Kyaw, etc. by using juice and fruits instead of coconut milk. It’s very easy to make at home just by boiling agar and sugar together until dissolved, then adding coconut milk. Once the dessert has cooled and hardened enough, just cut into diamond (or other) shape and then it is ready to serve and savor. Palm Sugar Sago (Tapioca)Sago or Tapioca is also easy to make and delicious to eat. It can be eaten warm or cold and is a mixture of sago and palm sugar syrup. To make the dessert simply boil sago grains until they are translucent, then take out from the pot and set aside to cool. Then make the palm sugar syrup.  To serve, put approximately 4 tablespoons of chilled sago into a tall glass, add 3 tablespoons syrup (or more according to taste) and mix well. Add 2 or 3 ice cubes and fill up with coconut milk. Stir and serve immediately. Most locals in Myanmar prefer to eat sago warm. To make warm sago, add cool sago again in the pot and add shredded coconut, sweet potato or banana after the palm sugar has dissolved. You can further add coconut milk if you like.Shwe Yin AyeShwe Yin Aye (a drink that can make you feel cool) contains all the above snacks (Mont Let Saung, Kyauk Kyaw, Sago), coconut milk, sugar syrup, bread, jelly bean and sticky rice. To make the sticky rice simply cook the glutinous rice in a normal rice cooker but with less water. For each serving, put the following ingredients in a big bowl.Mont Let Saung Phat (3 tablespoons)Kyauk  Kyaw (2 pieces)Sago (1 tablespoon)Sticky rice (1 tablespoon)Bread (2 slices or more)Jelly Bean (1 table spoon or more)Coconut Milk (about 10 tablespoon)Sugar Syrup (2 tablespoon or more)If you’d like to eat cool, just add 3 or 4 ice tubes. Then it’s ready to serve.Source: Internet
Things you need to know about Vietnamese cuisine

Things you need to know about Vietnamese cuisine

Vietnam’s food is one of the most fascinating parts of the country’s culture. It is complex, dynamic and often surprising – but never boring. Here are eight things you probably didn’t know about Vietnamese cuisine.Pho and spring rolls are well-known dishes, but there’s so much more to Vietnamese food than you might expect. Full of intriguing foods and flavors, Vietnam’s cuisine is endlessly interesting and offers a valuable insight into the country’s culture. Read on to discover the most remarkable aspects of Vietnamese dining.Five is the magic numberLike many Asian cuisines, Vietnamese food is underpinned by the Xu Wing and Mahābhūta principles. These philosophies emphasize the importance of the balance between the five elements for health and well-being. This means that each Vietnamese dish features a careful combination of five flavors: sweet, sour, salty, bitter and hot. This sensational synthesis makes every meal an invigorating and memorable experience.Savory breakfastsBreakfast in Vietnam is strictly a savory affair; you’re unlikely to find many people chowing down on sugary breakfast cereals here. The Vietnamese are early risers and they need serious fuel, so it’s all about steaming hot soup, broken rice and banh mi for starting the day. The country’s famous pho is in fact traditionally a breakfast dish – although it can be consumed any time of the day.Liquid dessertsGiven the often sweltering temperatures in Vietnam, it’s no surprise that people tend to prefer cold, liquid desserts. Che refers to Vietnamese dessert soups, drinks and puddings, which often consist of coconut milk, mung or kidney beans and fruit – to name just a few of many potential ingredients. The tastiest options include che chuoi (banana and coconut milk soup) and che bap (sweetcorn and glutinous rice pudding). If you’re looking for a photogenic dessert be sure to try chè ba mau, a traffic light-colored drink made with beans and jelly that’s instantly refreshing.Regional differencesVietnam is divided into three main regions: north, south and central. Although there are common threads between the cuisines of these areas, each boasts its own individual characteristics. In Northern Vietnam, food tends to be less spicy and black pepper is strongly favoured over chilli. It’s also home to the legendary bún cha, which Barack Obama and Anthony Bourdain famously enjoyed together in 2016. Central Vietnam, however, boasts complex mixtures of spicy flavours. The cuisine of Hue, the ancient capital of Vietnam, is particularly revered for its variety of distinctive and delicious dishes. Southern Vietnamese cuisine tends to be sweeter and the region’s fertile soil means that herbs are used more liberally in cooking. The southern version of pho tends to be more popular than its northern counterpart, although it’s best to try both to be sure.Animal blood soupRaw animal blood – usually from a duck or pig – is a delicacy in Vietnam. Tiet canh is a soup made from freshly slaughtered animal blood, fish sauce, cooked meat and herbs. Its taste is described as cool, sour and buttery, often washed down with some strong rice wine. Tiet canh can be found on the street but is also often consumed during festive occasions, such as the Lunar New Year, when the animal is typically slaughtered at the host’s home.Coffee cultureVietnam is the world’s second largest coffee exporter and their beans are nothing short of phenomenal. Strong and full of flavor, Vietnamese coffee (known affectionately by some as ‘rocket fuel’) packs an intense punch, delighting your senses and keeping you buzzing all day. One of the most popular ways to enjoy it is with condensed milk over ice, otherwise known as ca phe sua da The delightful cafes where it’s served are almost as enjoyable as the drink itself, with many of the best ones tucked away in little secret corners and narrow hems.Fetal duck eggsHot vit lon– duck eggs containing partially developed foetuses – are popular street foods in Vietnam. Often washed down with beer, these eggs are boiled and eaten straight from the shell, with sides and condiments varying regionally. Hot vit lon are beloved in Vietnam due to their rich taste and high nutritional value, and are also popular in several other Southeast Asian countries. The eggs are traditionally consumed by pregnant women for strength and fortification.Fish sauceFish sauce – or nuoc mam – is a major component of Vietnamese cuisine. Made from fermented anchovies and salt, the sauce tends to lose its strong fish taste when combined with other ingredients and instead adds simultaneously sweet and salty flavours to the food. This incredibly versatile condiment is used in many popular dishes and as a delicious dipping sauce for spring rolls, bun cha and broken rice. No experience of Vietnamese cuisine is complete without a taste of nước mam.Source The Culture Trip