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What to do in Mandalay, Myanmar

What to do in Mandalay, Myanmar

Mandalay is the second largest city in Myanmar and one that often gets overlooked by tourists. Visitors generally fly into Yangon and head straight for the popular tourist areas of Bagan, Inle Lake, and Ngapali Beach. But they really have no idea what they are missing! The city of Mandalay and the area surrounding it is filled with gorgeous pagodas, spectacular waterfalls, friendly locals eager to practice their English speaking skills, and delicious food.Explore Mandalay PalaceExplore Mandalay PalaceMandalay Palace is actually not the original building but a reconstruction that was built in the 1990s. It is also not one building, but actually a series of 40 different houses that were built from wood to closely resemble the originals which would have been built in the 1850s and were sadly razed to the ground by a fire.One of the highlights of a trip here is the wooden watchtower which is a great place to come if you want to take in the scenic views all over Mandalay. Also make sure to check out the ornate throne room which features a gilt pyramid and you can see other historical sight like a four poster bed that would have belonged to the king.Visit U-Bein BridgeVisit U-Bein BridgeU-Bein Bridge is a popular spot for tourists during the day and at sunset. If you want to visit without a ton of other tourists snapping pictures then consider getting up early and heading there for sunrise.This bridge is a 1.2-kilometer long bridge made of teak wood. It was originally built in the 1850s but has had to be restored many times since then. When we visited at sunrise it was quite fun because a ton of locals were going about their day, using the bridge as a footpath or even doing morning exercises. There is no entrance fee to U-Bein Bridge and it is located about 9 kilometers from Mandalay city center.Visit the Jade MarketVisit the Jade MarketAs one of Myanmar’s largest exports, the buzzing Jade Market in Mandalay is a must-see attraction. Hardly a tourist is in sight as visitors meander the crowded stalls overflowing with jadeite, otherwise known as jade. It is estimated that some 70% of the world’s jade originated in Myanmar, and the Jade Market seems to house the majority of it. Large blocks of this stunning material are found on the outskirts of the main alleyways winding throughout the market.Watch a show at the Mandalay MarionettesWatch a show at the Mandalay MarionettesIf you want to check out the local culture in Mandalay then there is no better way to do it than with a trip to the Mandalay Marionettes. Here you will find a small stage and a colorful marionette show which usually tells the story of traditional Burmese legends.The puppeteers have been working here for years and they will also give you a tour backstage to see how the puppets work. You can also purchase puppets here if you are looking for a quirky souvenir to take home.Eat Incredibly Cheap Burmese FoodEat Incredibly Cheap Burmese FoodMandalay is teeming with cheap, street side restaurants. Often, these eateries lack any sort of signs that indicate the name of the restaurant or what it is they are serving, however, the food is likely to be delicious. Visitors can indulge in entire feasts for only 2,000 kyat and sometimes less. Some interesting dishes found in Myanmar that visitors should try include bean paste salad, Shan noodles, and tea leaf salad.Source Internet
How to spend 48 hours in Chiang Rai, Thailand

How to spend 48 hours in Chiang Rai, Thailand

Got 48 hours in Chiang Rai? Do not worry, even with just a little bit of time you can still get a comprehensive and exciting taste of what this city has to offer. Explore some of the popular cultural sights, try local specialties, discover the nightlife and more! Check out our helpful guide on how to make the most of your time in Chiang Rai.Visit the White TempleVisit the White TempleA visit to Chiang Rai will not be complete without visiting its most renowned temple, Wat Rong Khun. Built by one of the country’s national artist, Chalermchai Kositpipat, the White Temple mirrors one’s journey from hell to heaven, with one-way gates and bridges for visitors to journey through the temple grounds. Wat Rong Khun is not like your conventional temple; the interior murals are dotted with paintings of popular culture. Look closely and you will find the likes of Michael Jackson, Superman, and even your favourite Despicable Me minions! Indeed, the White Temple is a splendid showcase of one of Thailand’s esteemed artist.Uncover the secrets of The Black HouseUncover the secrets of The Black HouseNot as famous as the White Temple, Chiang Rai’s black house is still a fascinating place to visit. This quirky and curious museum was inspired by Chaloemchai Khositphiphat, the mastermind behind the White Temple and the Chiang Rai Clock Tower. The Black House has a traditional Thai feel at first glance, however, once you look a little further, you see a more morbid side appear, with decorations made out of animal skins and skulls. The artist hoped to create a space that shows the darker side of human thoughts and actions, and this is highlighted with an onsite torture chamber in one of the outlying buildings. It is easy to spend a couple of hours unravelling the inner thoughts of the artist as you explore this unique attraction.Visit Wat Huay Pla Kung TempleVisit Wat Huay Pla Kung TempleLocated just 6km North East of Chiang Rai itself and within the Golden Triangle limits, Wat Huay Pla kung is easily seen from a distance with its extraordinary stunning white, skyscraper of a statue.Often mistaken as a giant Buddha, the first thing you will see when heading towards this particular temple is the giant statue of a female Bodhisattva, Guanyin; a Chinese goddess of mercy and compassion. Away from the tourist track, heading up here means that not only will you gain some amazing views from both the top of the 9-tier Pagoda as well as from the dizzy heights of the Bodhisattva’s third eye; you will be able to do it in relative peace.Watch a musical light show at the town’s clock towerWatch a musical light show at the town’s clock towerRight in the centre of Chiang Rai city, this incredibly intricate golden clock tower is indeed a remarkable iconic landmark of the town. Every evening, a short musical performance transforms the dusty street into an oasis of glitzy lights. Do not be late, the show starts at 8pm sharp at the junction of Thanon Jet Yot and Thanon Baanpa Pragarn!Go on a treetop walk adventureTucked within the premises of Mae Fah Luang Garden is a treetop walk adventure 30 metres above ground amongst the jungle trees. The 390-metre long suspension bridge is guaranteed to be a unique way to explore the garden from a different perspective!Experience authentic northern Thai foodPhoto LuxuryRan Lab Sanam Keela takes you on a culinary journey of authentic Lanna food. This is one of the most well-known restaurants in Chiang Rai. Although the menu offers only a few dishes, all of them are irresistible delicacies that reflect the traditional dining culture of the area. The Yang Ruam is particularly recommended; pla tabtim tod kratiem, tom sab moo and jeen neung are also worth a try. Enjoy!Source Internet
Top surprisingly cold destinations in Southeast Asia

Top surprisingly cold destinations in Southeast Asia

Believe it or not, some parts of Southeast Asia get pretty chilly and will have you reaching for your scarf rather than your sun cream – here are some of the chilliest destinations in the region that you’ll want to visit.Chiang Mai, ThailandLocated in the northern Thai highlands, Chiang Mai is a bustling town full of culture, food and outdoor activities. Whilst it can reach high temperatures in the 30s, the months of December and January are remarkably cool for Thailand, with average lows of around 15°C – no need to worry about sun burn here. Whilst it may get nippy, its locations amongst mountains and rolling hills means there are a number of great treks for travellers of all shapes and sizes to keep your warm. The Chiang Mai Night Bazaar is a great market full of tasty, spicy food to warm your soul, and it’s a great place to pick up handmade crafts and extra clothes – because let’s face it, who really things about bringing a warm hat or scarf to Thailand?Chiang Rai, ThailandAlso in the northern highlands of Thailand, Chiang Rai is around 200km from Chiang Mai and even further north. With an average yearly temperature of 24.6°C that drops into the teens around the New Year period, Chiang Rai is perfect for those who are a little sick of sweating their clothes off and want a destination where they can cool down. That said, there’s more to Chiang Rai than just a colder climate; the stunningly ornate White Temple – or Wat Rong Khun – is a must see for anyone in the region and is amongst Thailand’s most striking temples. As well as a great temple, it also features intricately detailed sculptural masterpieces that need to be seen in person to fully appreciate them. As well as jaw-dropping temples, the nature around Chiang Mai offers great hiking routes, with waterfalls, mountains and rainforests just waiting to be explored.Sapa, VietnamFew people who head to the scenic mountainous town of Sapa in Vietnam leave feeling anything but spellbound. Mornings are shared with dreamy views of the rolling hills and rice terraces enveloped in the thick, cold mist that sets in the valleys. Friendly local hill tribes such as the Hmong are happy to show off their wares, and with a yearly average of 16°C – falling to 10°C in January – you’d be wise to purchase a blanket or extra layers from them for warmth. It’s a region of unrivaled beauty, with mountains and hills in all directions and more trekking trails than you could count, more often than not culminating with gorgeous views or natural features such as waterfalls. You’ll get goosebumps in more than one way here – simply a must-visit in Southeast Asia.Cameron Highlands, MalaysiaWhilst parts of Malaysia can get pretty hot, the Cameron Highlands stay cool all year, rarely reaching above 25°C and dropping to the low teens quite frequently. The high altitude and cooler climate makes it an ideal place for growing tea, and so a common sight is that of tea plantations stretching out as far as the eye can see. As well as seeing it, you can also taste it – a welcome relief once the cold starts to set in. The Cameron Highlands are also ideal for growing strawberries, so count on tasty smoothies and cakes to provide you with energy for the many trekking routes through the area and any adventures you may take. Down in the towns such as Tanah Rata, there are markets selling delicious, fresh, local cuisine, with the curries sure to warm your bones.Bukittinggi, IndonesiaThere’s more to Indonesia than diving and the beaches of Bali, so for something a little different head to Bukittinggi. Located 930m above sea level in Western Sumatra, Bukittingi is a charming city with a comfortably cool climate, usually between 16-24°C. Located near both active and inactive volcanoes, there are plenty of things to do for those who love the great outdoors; visits to Sianok Canyon for example feature rivers, forests, rice paddies and stunning canyons to take in on your trek. If you’re all trekked out, then you might want to visit Colmar Tropicale. It’s a unique place designed to look like a typical French village, with colourful, architecturally French-styled building that’ll make you feel like you’ve wandered out of Indonesia and straight into the French countryside.Sagada, PhillipinesAnother mountainous region on the list, Sagada is a sleepy town that offers a cooler alternative to those Filipino beaches and islands that have been plastered all over social media lately. With temperatures ranging from 13-24°c, there’s no need to pack your swimsuit – though a decent pair of hiking shoes will come in handy. The vistas are straight out of Lord of the Rings, with a few added rice terraces, and as one might expect hiking is a popular activity for visitors to the area. As well as walks, there are valleys, caves and waterfalls to enjoy, with Bomod-Ok Falls a wonderful example of the majesty of nature. Not feeling particularly in the mood for the outdoors? Check out the hanging coffins of Sagada; though macabre sounding, the sight of real coffins hanging in the valley isn’t something you see every day, and it’s an interesting tidbit of culture from the local area.Source: Internet
The amazing things to do in Little India, Singapore

The amazing things to do in Little India, Singapore

Of all the ethnic enclaves in Singapore, Little India is the city at its most liveliest and colourful. With narrow little lanes and a bustling community, things can get a little messy here, quite unlike the rest of orderly Singapore. Keep your cameras ready for unexpected sights, and come with an empty stomach to eat all the good food around here. Here is top things you should do in Little India.Sri Srinivasa Perumal TempleSri Srinivasa Perumal TempleThe Sri Srinivasa Perumal temple along Serangoon Road is a Hindu temple built in the late 1800s, dedicated to Sri Srinivasa Perumal or Lord Vishnu, the preserver and protector of the universe. Once known as Narasinga Perumal Kovil, this temple in Little India is known for its five-tiered gopuram or gatehouse tower covered with the many avatars of Vishnu and other Hindu deities. The temple is the starting point for Kavadi carriers during the annual Thaipusam celebrations.House of Tan Teng NiahHouse of Tan Teng NiahThe House of Tan Teng Niah is a colourful 2-storey villa dating back to 1900. Located on Kerbau Road, It is one of few remaining Chinese structures in Little India that were built during the colonialization of Singapore.  The local community is responsible for the rainbow of colours that the House of Tan Teng Niah is so famous for, as well as its renovation and upkeep. After snapping some photos of the villa, grab yourself a biryani meal in the nearby courtyard for a particularly picturesque al fresco dining.Mustafa CentreMustafa CentreOne stop shopping just got a new definition, buy gold at Mustafa Centre just as easily as Bollywood DVDs and instant curry packages. Add to this eclectic mix a travel agency, visa centre, currency exchange and a post office! A trip to the fabled Mustafa is less of a visit and more of an experience. The cult status it enjoys in Singapore is partly because you may find an aisle dedicated to some strange elusive item that is unavailable in the rest of the city. Another reason for its presence on the must do list is the sheer scale of this mega mall, it has everything you need at prices that cannot be beaten. Open 24 hours a day, you can do your grocery as well as stuff the luggage you just bought from here with irresistible knick knacks to take home.Indian Heritage CentreIndian Heritage CentreThis shiny modern building inspired by the Indian baoli (or stepwell) sticks out amidst the narrow streets and old shop houses found in Little India. This four-storey building houses a significant collection of artefacts promoting the diverse Indian diaspora and heritage, including a permanent exhibition of the history of the Indian community in Singapore. It is educational, never too jam-packed with people, and a great spot to chill out and soak in some heritage on a hot afternoon.Temple of 1,000 LightsTemple of 1,000 LightsThe Sakya Muni Buddha Gaya Temple was built in the 1927 by a Thai monk, and the Siamese influences are clear to be seen throughout The main feature of this Buddhist temple is a 15-metre-tall Buddha statue that weighs about 300 tonnes. It is often called the Temple of 1,000 Lights, thanks to the chain of lamps surrounding the statue. Located between the Little India and Farrar Park MRT stations, entrance to Sakya Muni Buddha Gaya Temple is free but do dress modestly out of respect for the worshippers.Serangoon RoadSerangoon RoadLittle India’s ‘it’ place is Serangoon Road, the action here is centred around a few blocks on both sides of the road, and can easily be explored on foot. In fact, one of the popular walking tours in Little India, Serangoon Road charms with its hawkers and stalls that spill onto the road. The entertainment quotient is high with Bollywood numbers changing at every doorway you cross. The India experience is complete, colourful garlands sold at all corners and incense floating around in abundance.Source Internet
What to do when you are in Sapa

What to do when you are in Sapa

Sapa is home to stunning mountain landscapes, verdant rice terraces, unique stilt villages and Indochina peak, the Fansipan. The most prominent attraction in the town of Sapa is Fansipan, which is the highest mountain in Vietnam and it is only 19km from town.Trek and visit tribal villagesTribal trekking is commonplace in Sapa wherein visitors are guided through the many villages to immerse in authentic cultural experiences, enjoy local cuisine and surround themselves with the beautiful folds of rice terraces. If you are keen on traversing the cultures and traditions of the tribal groups, this experience will provide a hands-on and unmediated experience, contrary to merely visiting landmarks and points of interests.Stroll near Sapa LakeTired of shopping or walking around? Take a breather at the Sapa Lake which emanates a blend of tranquility and marvellous grandeur. You can walk along the stretch of the lake or alternatively enjoy your food at the benches provided and wallow in the repose of your mind.Climb the FansipanThe highlight of Sapa has to be the Fansipan Mountain. With an elevation of 3,143m, it is the highest mountain in Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia, and a triumphant embodiment of the ‘Roof of Indochina’. If you are up for a challenge, the climb is doable in a day, approximately within 10 to 12 hours. Most guide treks, however, suggest a two or three-day climb to pace the trek and minimise exertion especially for those who are less physically fit. The choice is up to you but it is advisable to hire a professional guide or porters if needed.Muong Hoa ValleyNo trip to Sapa is complete without treading on the bright green rice terraces – a manifestation of the livelihood of the Sapa hill tribes who are heavily dependent on rice cultivation. If mountain treks are over-taxing and arduous for you, then a trek along the rice terraces of Muong Hoa Valley is perfect!Cat Cat VillageAnother alternative to the onerous mountain hikes would be a visit to the Cat Cat Village. While you are likely to experience a very long walk with numerous steps, it is certainly less strenuous.The Hmong village people are friendly and albeit the many assertions of over-commercialisation in the area, the Cat Cat Village is still a nice spot to take touristy photos at the water wheels and watch some local performances.Source: Internet
Visit Malacca, the old town in Malaysia

Visit Malacca, the old town in Malaysia

Malacca (Melaka) is a famous tourist destination with a rich cultural heritage, subsequent to the colonial rule of Portuguese, Dutch and British. It becomes one of the hottest tourist destinations in Malaysia because of its centuries-old architecture that gives you a glimpse of Malacca's glorious past.Dutch SquareDutch Square Malacca is the most picturesque along Jalan Kota. It's also a colorful trishaw pickup point, it is distinguished by a group of bright, terracotta-red colonial Dutch buildings, built between 1660 and 1700, with louvered windows and chunky doors with wrought iron hinges.Jonker StreetThis street is the center of Chinatown of Malacca. It began in Dutch Colonial times as the home to many of the servants of Dutch nobility. However, after the Dutch left, it became the home of the nobles themselves. Many seventeenth-century manors remain here, along with a large number of shops, restaurants and other amenities. When the large Chinese presence moved in, decorative accents like a large Chinese-style archway were added. The street is blocked off every Friday, Saturday and Sunday evening to become a pedestrian-only night market.Maritime MuseumWith monthly visitors around 20,000 people, Maritime Museum is the most visited museum in Malacca. The museum main exhibits the replica of Flor de la Mar. The museum also houses exhibits, artifacts and documents from the golden era of Malacca and shows how political control of Malacca was essential to the establishment of maritime dominance in the region. It also displays the trading link of Malacca from the early time through the colonial era until independence.St. Paul's ChurchOriginally built by a Portuguese captain in 1521 as a simple chapel, St. Paul’s Church offers views over Malacca from the summit of Bukit St Paul. St. Francis Xavier, one of the founders of the Jesuit order, used the church as his base for his missionary journeys to China and Japan. In one of those journeys, Xavier fell sick and eventually died in China in 1552. His body was temporarily interred here for nine months before being transferred to Goa, where it remains today. Visitors can look into his ancient tomb inside the church, and a marble statue of the saint gazing over the city.StadthuysThe Stadthuys (an old Dutch spelling, meaning city hall) is a historical structure situated in the heart of Malacca City, the administrative capital of the state of Malacca, Malaysia in a place known as the Red Square. The Stadhuys is known for its red exterior and nearby red clocktower. It was built by the Dutch in 1650 as the office of the Dutch Governor and Deputy Governor.Source: Internet
What to do in Phan Thiet, Vietnam

What to do in Phan Thiet, Vietnam

The area is just 4-hour train ride away from the chaos of Ho Chi Minh City but seems like a different world altogether. There are endless reasons for visiting Mui Ne and Phan Thiet. It is tough to choose between gorgeous sunsets, glistening beaches, surreal scenery, and picture-perfect villages but here is top things to do in Phan Thiet.Red Sand DunesRed Sand DunesThe Red Sand Dunes are one of Phan Thiet’s most unique natural formations, where you can take gorgeous snapshots and enjoy an array of activities. Located three kilometres north of Mui Ne, it features reddish-brown sand with gentle slopes that is reminiscent of a miniature Middle Eastern desert. If you get to the highest peak, you will be greeted with a great sunset view of the ocean. Sand-sledding is a common activity here, with plastic sleds available for about VND 10,000 to VND 20,000. Be aware you have to haggle to rent the boards as the local boys will try to charge extortionate fees to rent the thin sheet of plastic. Visitors can also rent quad bikes and dune buggies to explore Red Sand Dunes, but make sure you agree on the price beforehand.The Fairy StreamThe Fairy StreamThis stream is another wonderful place in Mui Ne to discover. Tucked between fishing villages and beaches, the gurgling stream is naturally surrounded by lime stones. Deposit your shoes at the entrance or carry your shoes along with you, then explore this muddy stream. Enjoy the warm water; make your way through green trees and colorful limestone formations and you will reach the waterfall.Fish Market of Mui Ne In The Early MorningFish Market of Mui Ne In The Early MorningIn early morning, the chaotic market of Mui Ne provides an attracting peek into the daily life of local fishermen. Each morning, they get fresh caught seafood to the shore. Their family members sort out all the catch and sell it to local traders, street food vendors and restaurant owners. This picture is somehow like a trading floor out of a Wall Street institution. This is one of the most interesting things to do in Phan Thiet – Mui Ne tourists can consider.Ke Ga LighthouseKe Ga LighthouseAbout an hour away from Phan Thiet is a beautiful beach with a lighthouse known as Ke Ga Lighthouse. This lonely sentinel standing on a rocky promontory is said to be built sometime in the 1800’s.Van Thuy Tu TempleVan Thuy Tu TempleVan Thuy Tu Temple, dating back to 1762, is the largest and oldest whale temple in Phan Thiet – Mui Ne. Built in honour of Ca Ong, locals believe that whales are benevolent creatures that protect fisherman from bad weather and the dangers at sea. Therefore, Van Thuy Tu Temple houses the skeletal remains of more than 100 whales, including 22-metre long whale skeleton that is thought to have been the biggest in Southeast Asia. Numerous artefacts from the Nguyen Dynasty are also displayed within the main hall of the temple, such as written decrees by 24 former kings, terracotta statues, incense table, lacquered boards, and an antique bronze bell. WindsurfingWindsurfingMui Ne is rapidly becoming a South East Asian Mecca for windsurfing and other water sports. This place has the best conditions for water sports as it has the strongest and most cross-onshore winds in Asia along with the lowest rainfall in Vietnam. Each day is an ideal day for such sports.The area is usually referred to by the water sport industry as “Mui Ne Bay”; despite the bay is more precisely the “Bay of Phan Thiet”. Windsurfing is considered as one of the most popular water sports in Vietnam. There are a large number of fans of this sport, both locals and tourists who are looking for some rejuvenating options for recreation in Vietnam. Mui Ne is one of the windiest sites in Vietnam, so you could enjoy wonderful windsurfing almost at anytime of the year. Here, the temperatures are rather constant so you will feel comfortable and warm throughout the year. The best time for windsurfing in Mui Ne is from November to February annually.Source Internet
The worth-visiting destinations in Bangkok, Thailand

The worth-visiting destinations in Bangkok, Thailand

Bangkok is everything you would expect from the capital of Thailand, it is noisy, crowded, colorful, exciting, infuriating, and smile-inducing. There are temples, ancient sites, and other attractions to be visited, as well as modern shopping malls that have a kitschy yet high-end ambience. Bangkok can be overwhelming, but it is also a fascinating city that represents Southeast Asia's tension between the developed and developing worlds.Jim Thompson’s HouseJim Thompson’s HouseOften counted amongst the top 17 places to visit in Bangkok, Thailand, Jim Thompson’s House is an offbeat yet an intriguing attraction in the city. Jim, the famous American Spy stayed in Thailand after World War II ended, and revived the lost art in the city. The collection and construction of the six buildings here very well reflect the grandeur of the traditional Thai architecture. If you like visiting museums, this attraction in Bangkok should be on your list.Wat ArunWat ArunWat Arun is something of a triumphant complex, dating back to the time of ancient battles between the former Siam and Burma. Having fallen to the Burmese, Ayutthaya was reduced to rubble and ashes, but General Taksin and the remaining survivors vowed to march "until the sun rose again" and to build a temple here. Wat Arun, the Temple of the Dawn, was that temple. It is where the new king later built his royal palace and a private chapel.If you climb to the top of the prang just before sunset, you will be rewarded with an unforgettable view as the sun sinks over the Chao Praya River. Even if you do not plan on doing any climbing, sunset is really the time to take in this place in all its glory.Grand Palace and Wat PrakeawGrand Palace and Wat PrakeawThe Grand Palace and Wat Prakaew command respect from all who have walked in their sacred grounds. Built in 1782, and for 150 years the home of Thai Kings and the Royal court, the Grand Palace continues to have visitors in awe with its beautiful architecture and intricate detail. Wat Pra Kaew enshrines Phra Kaew Morakot (the Emerald Buddha), the sacred Buddha image meticulously carved from a single block of emerald.Lumphini ParkLumphini ParkThis park is an ideal place for basking in the bliss of tranquility, fresh breeze, and nature’s shade. Perfect for travelers of all the ages, it is home to various flora, fauna, and refreshing experiences like rowing, paddle boating and more. Be it a family trip, a solo exploration, or a romantic getaway, you ought to visit the Lumphini Park whenever you are in Bangkok. It is a great place to enjoy a day picnic with family and kids. It is also counted among one of the most famous places to visit in Bangkok with friends!Chatuchak MarketChatuchak MarketBangkok's sprawling semi-outdoor weekend market is the largest in the world. Shoppers can find everything from jewelry and religious icons to pet supplies, paper lamps, and delicious street food here. Chatuchak Market is home to over 15,000 stalls offering just about anything you can dream up-even better, any souvenir you might want is probably available here at a much cheaper price than anywhere else in Bangkok.This is a great place to mingle with locals and immerse yourself in everyday Thai life, so arrive early and clear your schedule for the rest of the day if you want to do this place justice.Safari WorldSafari WorldUnlike the other zoos, the popular Safari World in Bangkok lets animals roam around freely at their own pace. It has a spacious Safari Park, where you can drive through and spot wildlife, and also a Marine Park, where you can watch entertaining live shows, indulge in local cuisines, and shop for souvenirs. Undoubtedly, this is an ideal place to visit for a thrilling day out. Not just kids, this is one of the best places to visit in Bangkok for adults too.Source Internet
Where to visit first in Laos

Where to visit first in Laos

The only landlocked country in Southeast Asia, Laos is one of the most authentic countries in the world. The following places to visit for your first trip to Laos are the major highlights in the country.Vang ViengVang Vieng is the most popular destination in Laos among budget travellers and backpackers. It’s situated in central Laos and is surrounded by gorgeous natural scenery of karst hills, limestone mountains, caves and tunnels, and rivers. It could be considered to be Laos’ adventure capital. There are many tour companies offering adventurous activities, from kayaking and tubing to spelunking and hiking. The downtown bar scene is worth checking out as well.Bolaven PlateauSouthern Laos’ Bolaven Plateau is a landscape of thundering waterfalls, dense forests and tea and coffee plantations. Located more than 1,000 metres above sea level, the plateau is blessed with a milder and cooler climate than most of the rest of the country. The abundance of natural highlights, such as the Tad Fane and Dong Hua Sao waterfalls, invites visitors to strap on a pair of hiking boots and head into the jungle.Luang PrabangLuang Prabang, set on a peninsula at the confluence of the Mekong and Nam Khan Rivers, was the royal capital of Laos until 1975, when the communists took over. The city is the most visited destination in Laos and, home to several amazing sights, is also a UNESCO World Heritage Site. In Luang Prabang, you will see bald orange-robed monks, old temples with golden roofs and French colonial buildings.Plain of JarsOne of the most unusual sights in Southeast Asia, and also one of the world’s main archaeological mysteries, the Plain of Jars occupies a large area around the city of Phonsavan. There are hundreds of stone jars or urns, spread out among several archaeological sites. No one knows their purpose. When you visit Laos, this is an absolutely must-see attraction.Wat PhuWat Phu, also known as Vat Phou, means ‘mountain temple’ and is a complex of ancient Khmer temple ruins. This complex of Hindu temples dates from between the 11th an 13th century and consists of tall trees, pavilions, pillars, courtyards, shrines, palaces and much more. The historical importance of this marvelous site is shown in the fact that it was declared World Heritage by UNESCO.VientianeVientiane is the capital of Laos and features many fascinating sites and sights. It’s a free-spirited city with a beautiful waterfront that lines the Mekong River. Other attractions are the stunning Phat That Luang stupa, the hundreds of Buddha statues in Wat Sisaket and the triumphal arc known as Patuxai. Additionally, you can also enjoy the incredibly relaxed atmosphere and the surprising mix of cultures—Chinese, Vietnamese, Lao, French and American.Mekong RiverSoutheast Asia’s greatest river is more than 4,000 kilometres long, a large section of which lies in Laos. In a country that lacks proper roads and is covered with mountains and hills that aren’t always easy to access, the Mekong River provides the major transportation route. An absolute highlight of any trip to Laos, or to Southeast Asia in general, is taking a cruise on the Mekong River.Source: Internet